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. [ sniffles ] ♪ >> harris: breaking news now on the fox report and the pentagon confirming to fox news that retired general norman schwarzkopf has died. he commanded the coalition that pushed saddam hussein's forces out of kuwait in 1991. bob scales on the phone with us now. general scales you wrote a book called certain victory and you have a lot of knowledge of the history of the iraq war but personal knowledge with this man. you call him truly the first great american hero after vietnam. your thoughts? >> that is exactly right, harris. remember, i come from the same generation as general schwarzkopf and the vector was the vindication of my generation report vietnam generation because it was our first great military victory after defeat in vietnam and he took that personally. i knew general schwarzkopf well, going back to his time as a major in the pentagon. he also carried in his sack this rock that had the sigma that went with the defeat in vietnam. when defeated the iraqi military in the plains of iraq, when was able to do that one of the first things he said at the truce tent was
at the pentagon and other government agencies. let's bring in "usa today" washington bureau chief susan page and "the washington post" congressional reporter ed o'keefe. good morning to both of you and happy new year. >> good morning. >> same to you. >> the senate returns in about an hour. how close are they? what are you hearing? >> you know, i think it is conceivable that we'll have a new year's eve miracle and there will be a deal but i think the safe bet is against it. for this to happen in the next 14 hours you need to have no senator object to a majority vote, you know, any senator can start to filibuster and force the vote total up to 60 to continue working on any kind of deal they reach. and then you need john boehner to agree and house republicans to agree to bring it up in the same version or very similar version and i think the hurdles that have prevented us from getting a deal for two years are still there. so, i mean, we'll see what the next 14 hours brings but i wouldn't be too optimistic. >> if the senate does manage to hammer out a deal what are the chances the house will go
teal the pentagon is bracing for $500 billion but that is over the next decade and raises questions how military leaders plan to keep the nation safe. >> last friday when president obama rolled out his new plan for steering us away from the fiscal cliff there was word he did not say, that word was, sequester, the sequester would automatically cut more than a hundred billion from the budget next year, half from domestic programs and half from defense programs. as the deadline draws close, experts are looking at national security standpoint and warning one final time about the impact on the safety of our service members. >> it's going to affect the operational force that is deployed in terms of its ability to maintain equipment, to get repair parts. that force is delayed around the world, not just the force in afghanistan that is being reduced. it would impact on the training of the force and preparedness. >> reporter: white house officials say it's unclear what is going to happen. on friday john mccain said he doesn't see how a deal gets done without addressing the cuts. >> a lot of defe
that the pentagon says. but is it? chris lawrence has a closer look. >> reporter: to hear the pentagon tell it -- >> sequestration, therefore if it were allowed to happen, will introduce senseless chaos. >> the fiscal cliff -- >> sequestration will have a chaotic effect on the force. >> reporter: is akin to armaggedon. >> i worry about being blindsided by a huge cut because they don't have the strength or courage or guts to do what they have to do. >> happy holidays. >> reporter: the cliff would cut $500 billion in defense spending, but spread out over the next ten years. would these cuts really be that bad? >> absolutely not. >> reporter: analyst ben freeman argues the pentagon can survive on a smaller budget. >> it will drop a little bit. but not catastrophic, doomsday, any sort of hyperbole. >> reporter: perhaps the navy would have to buy less expensive, less advanced fighter jets instead of the new f-35. or the pentagon would have to cut the number of soldiers and marines back to the numbers before 9/11. >> sequestration would risk hollowing out our force. >> reporter: pentagon official
>> did the pentagon have review? >> no, didn't have fop once i'm retired from active due any i don't have to submit it to the pentagon unless i use classified information. so i avoided using any classified information but a lot of stuff was declassified right after the war. a lot of stuff was a matter of public record. so i had a great deal of material. the best thing i had was this, any war i ever fought most of instructions were sent by message back and forth. so you have hard copy record of every decision made. because of where we are today most of the orders and instructions are seventh back and forth by secured telephone. it became apparent that we're not going have a record of the decisions made unless we have a record ourselves. any time i had a conversation i wrote down what i said and what is being said to me. i had someone in there who would write down every time i made a decision and he would log it into a private journal that we kept of every decision that was happening during the war. if it had not been through that the book would not be written. >> where are those 3,0
in cuts. how will this affect the nation's defense contracts? >> the pentagon will face $2 billion over nine years, that works out to $55 billion year cut starting in 2013. the army, navy, air force, marines and coast guard take equal, according to one military analyst who says the impact of the military is, quote, very serious. >> the pentagon and departments are in financial trouble because there has already been a 4 ebullient dollar cut. that is being applied, to take another cut on top of that is devastating. >> it is not just the military itself that will take a hit. defense contractors, private companies that work for the pentagon. one democratic congressman in virginia whose district may be hit hardest says it could mean layoffs. >> the large defense contractors will be okay. they have significant cash reserves, most of them. smaller contractors would have trouble getting their lines of credit extended, trouble keeping their employees if they can't be assured of continued employment. >> how did we get to this point? in the budget battles of 2011 these spending cuts were put in as
hit the pentagon and also domestic spend ising. they have according to the white house and senate republicans reached a deal but vice president biden is up on the senate side right now behind closed doors trying to convince some skeptical senate democrats to sign on to this before this piece of legislation hits the senate floor. we begin with our restart and to tell us exactly where we are at this hour, and this hour by the way is just two hours ahead of 2013. there you see the specifics of the deal. the framework. tax hikes on family income above $400,000 for an individual. $450,000 for a family. the top tax rate going to 39.6% from 35. 39.6% is the clinton range. the tax rate back in president clinton's term in office. prevents the expansion of the alternative minimum tax. the amt. essentially patches it permanently, the amt. that had long been a an annual chore for congress. extends long-term unemployment benefits and deals with a number of other specifics including tax credits and sets the estate tax individually at $5 million and an additional in tare hans beyond that at 40 o
in the pentagon budget for cuts? >> absolutely. serious conservatives need to make it very clear that taxpayers, republicans, conservatives are looking at the entire budget and saying where can we be more efficient and more effective? we have a rather large pentagon budget, larger than most of the other countries in the world that have armies, navys and air forces all added together -- >> combined. >> and we should have a strong military. we ought to keep the canadians on their side of the border, make sure nobody can throw a punch at us successfully. but to argue we can't reform some of the pension questions and contracting decisions that are made and the good news is the republican caucus, the conservative caucus among republicans, the republican study committee leader jim jordan made the comment that while he was concerned about how the sequester might affect defense, he was more concerned that those cuts might not take place. that was part of a strong america is not to have this massive spending that we've been having. >> i'll have you on for another discussion about your concerns for the c
the decision to invade iraq in 2003, but later, criticized the pentagon's war planning. mostly, though, schwarzkopf devoted his time to serving as a board member and spokesman for charitable causes, living quietly in tampa, florida, where he died yesterday at the age of 78. in a statement, the first president bush, now ailing himself, called his gulf war commander "a true american patriot and one of the great military leaders of his generation." for more on general schwarzkopf and his legacy, we are joined by "new york times" reporter michael gordon. he co-authored the book, "the generals' war: the inside story of the conflict in the gulf." michael, welcome. take us back first of all to the gulf war more than two decades ago. what was it about general schwarzkopf and what he did is that made him be regarded at least by many as a hero. >> well, this is the time in which the american military did not have the confidence of the american public the way it does now. whatever people think of the wars in afghanistan or iraq, they generally believe that the military has done its part. and that
. president obama stands up for his possible pentagon pick chuck hagel, but the president hasn't exactly committed to haag e's nomination. could it have something to do with the onslaught of republican criticism of the former senator? we'll tackle cabinet concerns next on "now." [ female announcer ] over the years, your mouth has sipped, snacked, ...yellowed... lived, loved, ...yellowed... chatted, chewed, ...yellowed. and over all those years, your teeth...have yellowed. fact is, if you're not whitening, you're yellowing. crest 3d white whitestrips remove over ten years of stains by going below the enamel surface. and, they whiten 25 times better than a leading whitening toothpaste. crest whitestrips. life opens up when you do. >> secretary of state hillary clinton remains hospitalized in new york city this hour with a blood clot which her office says stemmed from the concussion she sustained several weeks ago. clinton will be evaluated over the next 48 hours and is taking blood thinners to reduce the close, the location of which has not been revealed. her hospitalization is likely to f
about the pentagon. talk about federal workers. talk about obviously the unemploy unemployed whose benefits are going away. >> absolutely. the biggest -- the most dangerous thing, the fiscal cliff is the unemployment insurance. if we go over for a month we can sort of trick everything else. we can -- the irs can do some tricks to make it so you don't feel tax increases quickly. we can do tricks to make it so we don't lay off people at pentagon, we can furlough them. there's no trick with unemployment insurance. if we go over the cliff and don't do anything by unemployment insurance, 2 million people, hardest hit by the recession, will lose their unemployment insurance. that's number one. we're going to have the payroll tax cut expire, that's probably going to happen if we do reach a deal, that's one of the most important pieces of stimulative policy. the same said for refundable tax credits, helps poor folks. the same with the child tax credit. these have been really important for the working poor. you're going to see very, very big cuts to the government over time. we could paper
to give tax cuts? what is going on? as far as spending look at amount of money wasted in pentagon. wars in iraq before all the bills are in. liz: well, 800,000 pent -- pentagon workers may be cut, may be furloughed due to these spending cuts. the question becomes all of you, maybe that is our version of austerity? maybe we need to feel that pain? >> these cuts were --. liz: let me let representative mulvaney get first crack. >> let's try to find still very lining here. what we've learned from the american publlc during the last two weeks is as attention turned to the fiscal cliff, they don't want their taxes to go up. i get it, dennis gets it. everybody gets it. people don't want to pay more taxes. if you want to get rid of the deficit, ray taxes and cut spending. people said don't raise taxes. that only leaves spending side of the equation. the president needs to get the loud and clear as loud as he got it on taxes. maybe there silver lining. maybe we bring some long-term solution in the future. david: i don't see a silver lining coming out of washington. but, congressman huelskamp, th
. they seem desperate to do that. plenty of liberals say, go over the cliff. big cuts in the pentagon and big tax hikes. the white house, from all indications that i've seen, they don't want that to happen. they are scared of what could happen to the markets. >> why aren't they dalg dealing with boehner? dana, be go ahead. jumpb in here. >> i think they won their negotiating power once boehner last week failed. as dana pushed out, the only thing that can get boehner is to do something. >> reporter: i think that you're right when i said that democrats don't think that the president will have much political damage. that does seem to be coming more from democrats here in congress than in the white house. democrats here in congress feel that it's a win-win for them politically. the one thing i will tell you very quickly, the pushback on this narrative that i heard from senate republican leader in the hallway. he said, do you remember who the speaker was during the hoover administration? i said, no. he said, that's my point. nobody will remember who the speaker was if ge into a recession but it's
part of some last-second deal. hit the defense department. but the pentagon's real problem is not those cuts, but the ones that are going to be coming over the next decade. we talked to military contractors, top officials at the pentagon. they see a long period of downward decline. that after the war in afghanistan, there's going to be a period of austerity. they're calling it -- they have a term around the pentagon, a very graphic self-amputation as they cut back over the years. and this was one of the reasons that president obama had, at the top of his short list, the former republican senator, still a republican, chuck hagel of nebraska. he's somebody who's talked about the pentagon as being bloated, had very specific ideas about how to cut it. but mike, sam, the table, we're hearing that that trial balloon has been popped. that senator hagel has a possibility for secretary of defense, has really lost a lot of altitude. and what they discovered was, there's not a natural constituency for him. republicans, as you guys know, have fought with him over the years. he was against the war i
, the massive amount of spending cuts that will kick in at the beginning of the year to harm the pentagon and other agencies. if they are getting anything, there are low expectations but if they get anything it will be a very small deal, something much smaller than they have been talking about for weeks, jon. jon: there aren't too many people these meetings. so a little hard to get an assessment, what is your idea, what is your best, yeah, assessment i guess how things are between some of these leaders? >> reporter: they have gotten pretty tense the last couple of days as they have come back from the christmas holiday. we saw yesterday senate majority leader harry reid basically accusing john boehner of running a deck tate toreship, that was his word in the house of representatives. reid piled on a little bit late yesterday afternoon and senate republican leader mitch mcconnell responded. take a listen. >> speaker boehner should call members of the house back to washington today. he shouldn't have let them two in fact. they're not here. they're not here. john boehner seeps to care more ab
their budgets cut, depending whether it the pentagon or other agencies. the agencies can try to shield some programs for others. social security benefits are not going to be cut. the pay for pentagon officials is not going to be cut. if this drags on into march or april, they will have to do furloughs, is essentially giving people vacations. host: the headline from "the wall street journal." is that one way to do that? guest: that is a painful way to do that. when people do not have money to spend, the economy is not going to grow. if this goes on for a couple of days and the stock market falls dramatically, congress and the white house may be able to avoid some of the long-term consequences. if everybody digs end, more disasters things could take hold. host: the president, vice president, speaker of the house, democratic leader of the house, will be meeting today. from the reporting you have done, what will be happening? guest: they could sit down and cut a deal in five minutes. they know all the issues. they know where their parties are. they could sit down in five minutes, shaking hands,
the automatic $492 billion in cuts to the pentagon over the next nine years is for congress to make a deal in the next two days. harris? >> peter, thank you. fox weather alert now. a new headache for travelers. tonight a fresh storm system is pummeling the northeast. as you know much of the region and really the rest of the country are recovering from the winter storm that hit earlier in the week. this new round of weather bringing even more snow, freezing rain and strong winds already causing some flight delays and making the roads dangerous. meteorologist justin povik with the accu-weather. justin? >> harris, i tell you, we cannot catch a break across the northeast and the nation's midsection. not to leave out the west coast. they have been stormy and wet, especially around san francisco. the meat of the storm system has been targeting the ohio valley and the northeast, and the latest is doing its dirty work across the coastal sections. the i-95 corridor. the worst of the worst we will target boston over the course of the next three to four hours approaching an inch an hour. snow totals
employment. >> the only way to avoid the automatic $492 billion in cuts to the pentagon over the next nine years is for congress to make a deal in the next two days. harris? >> peter, thank you. fox weather alert now. a new headache for travelers. tonight a fresh storm system is pummeling the northeast. as you know much of the region and really the rest of the country are recovering from the winter storm that hit earlier in the week. this new round of weather bringing even more snow, freezing rain and strong winds already causing some flight delays and making the roads dangerous. meteorologist justin povik with the accu-weather. justin? >> harris, i tell you, we cannot catch a break across the northeast and the nation's midsection. not to leave out the west coast. they have been stormy and wet, especially around san francisco. the meat of the storm system has been targeting the ohio valley and the northeast, and the latest is doing its dirty work across the coastal sections. the i-95 corridor. the worst of the worst we will target boston over the course of the next three to four hours appr
cuts aimed at the pentagon and elsewhere. >> the revenues have to be part of the equation in terping off the sequester. >> trouble on the left as well. senators grumbling the president gave away too much on the tax threshold of $450,000 or more. the white house is pushing back by saying that the president held firm on 39.6% at the top rate despite reports he might negotiate down to 38%. bret? >> bret: ed. in that event, the president didn't have a lot of details. it seems to be framed much like as you mention ad campaign style event. perhaps a signal that this is what we may see in the new year if the battle over the debt ceiling heats up in the next few weeks. >> in doubt. he did two things. going out and hitting republicans hard at this event he was making clear if they don't have the final deal, he will go out on the road and pound them in the days ahead to put the blame on them. the second thing he was doing, not just on the fiscal cliff. on immigration and other irks in the days ahead -- issues in the day ahead. he is going to take it to the american people on issue after issue,
massive mandatory spending cuts to the pentagon and domestic program goesing into affect in the new year, democrats want a one year extension, republicans insifrting on sooner. the president issued this warning about cuts only strategy. >> if they think that is going to be the form larks they've got another thing coming. it's not how goitsing to work. >> republicans bristledíróqj2lt remarks. >> it was dismissive and insulting. belittling and in the end, sad. >> senate republican leader mitch mcconnell didn't join n after months of refusing to vote, he said now is the time. everyone agrees that that action is necessary. and i can report we've reached an agreement on all of the tax issues. we're very, very, close. >> very close? but no cigar until tomorrow. and tonight, at midnight, the tax cuts expire for everybody. everybody's taxes go up. tomorrow, the republican-led house can lower rates and claim that they never raise taxes on the rich, and only voted for a tax cut. in the newsroom abc 7 news. >> a year end rally on wall street, investors responded to the opt nix talks before the n
questions. the pentagon and all the other government agencies told their employees that they're not going to do anything with the sequester in january, because they're assuming congress will get its act together in january, february or so. so the idea that the markets are going to panic over this, you know, i think is a red herring. who knows? maybe they tank tomorrow. maybe they go through the roof. but i don't see that happening. though if it did that would drive things a little bit. >> do you have any sense they're feeling pressure from constituents at all? i would describe this as people are profoundly unhappy. >> that's a great point. congress' approval ratings are abysmal. but the pressure from the right for conservatives to cut a good deal, all this discussion about chained cpi is confusion. basically it means that republicans want to include entitlement reform as part of a deal. but why did they take that off the table? because when the debt ceiling comes next year, they can have a bigger fight about entitlement reform. so the big story today is that republicans are starting to re
in and the pentagon will be forced to cut $9 million in spending. >> if lawmakers can't avoid the fiscal cliff, they may be able to avoid a different cliff, the dairy cliff. house and senate members appear likely to extend farm legislation for a year, a deal that would keep milk prices skyrocketing in january. we were worried about $6 gallon of milk. it could keep a decades old subsidy from coming back to life. the usda would be forced to buy milk at prices well above what farmers were getting now if the subsidy was revived. it could double the price of moib to $6.12 a gallon. >> markets have been reacting to each move on capitol hill, but obviously, things at this point are looking like the dow would open down by about 7.5 points. the dow is off 67 points and the nasdaq is down 14.75 points. all the surprised given the late hour that -- >> even if something doesn't happen today, it happens in two or three days. >> right. so if you were looking for a market reaction because a lot of the market iraqis we've heard has said, if highways the case, near not getting it base odd what they're going to
at the pentagon and domestic programs that were set to take effect today. >> i've said all along our most important priority was to protect the middle class families. this legislation does that. middle class families will wake up today to the assurance that their taxes won't go up. >> reporter: democratic senator tom harkin suggested the selection missed the mark. >> it does not address the number one priority, creating good middle class jobs now. secondly, this proposal does not generate the revenue necessary for the country to meet its needs. >> reporter: republican senate minority leader mitch mcconnell says neather side got everything it wanted. >> so it took an imperfect solution to prevent our constituents from a very real financial pain, but in my view, it was worth the effort. >> reporter: the republican- controlled house is expected to begin considering the bill later today. a final vote is expected in the next day or two. passage is not at all certain. in new york, patty ann brown, fox news. >> why do you think lawmakers waited until the last minute? we are getting a lot of feed
these numbers, there are also a bunch of other issues, you know, 800,000 pentagon workers could be furloughed, all kinds of other issues where emergency unemployment benefits might be ended. so there are lots of complications. but let's talk about people's portfolios, and if we were to go over the cliff which you don't believe is going to happen, but if we were, what would you invest in right now? >> i'd stick to being very conservative. there's a good chance we could dip into a recession. in that type of environment, you want to be in very safe and secure stocks, and you want to have a more conservative portfolio. you want to be invested in the high quality fixed-income and not be that global in your organization. liz: how would you characterize picking a secure stock? >> high dividend growth rate, very strong dividend payout rate as well, so one of those solid blue chip, large cap type of companies. liz: treasuries. i mean, the yield is kind of pathetic. >> and quite frankly, because i do think this'll be resolved, and i think treasuries are going to be one of the worst investments in the n
the pentagon. i don't know that is the best model to work on. gerri: i have to ask you about bp today. >> sure. gerri: there is big news coming from bp. federal government says you are disqualified from winning new contracts. here's bp's statement. suspension that is, due to bp's lack of business integrity as demonstrated by the company's conduct with regard to the deepwater horizon blowout explosion, oil spill and response. now the stock did not really get hit today. what is your estimate what this means? >> i think it will be a temporary move. i think the obama administration again is wanting to show, hold up bp that we're punishing them. this is an enormous company. it is one of the biggest oil and gas producers in the u.s.. gerri: doesn't it matter if it loses contracts in the u.s.? >> they have a lot of contracts already. those contracts don't go away. this is only on new contracts. it is important but i think it is a temporary deal. gerri: robert bryce, you must come back and sit on set again. >> always happy to be here. gerri: still ahead tonight, a mountain of new regulations coming ou
the pentagon. what did she tell you? >> reporter: well, this really is a heart breaking case. you know, i just have to put it in perspective, a military installation, a child care facility, a stone's throw from where i am standing at the pentagon, it would take me just a few minutes to walk across the road to this child care operation. a mother who has now learned that her young toddler was one of the victims of this alleged child abuse decided to speak out about it. she wanted her face shielded, she wants her children's privacy protected. she still worries about retaliation against her husband, by the military, but she tells us a chilling tale. >> all along this first week when we were being sort of given piecemeal information, denied access to the videotapes, we were also being asked if we wanted to seek medical care for our child. so -- >> medical care for what? >> for what, obviously. we wanted to understand and see with our own eyes since that evidence was available. >> barbara, it took a long time for the information to come out. why? and what steps is the department taking, the defense
, the spending cuts to the pentagon and elsewhere kick in. the bottom line is when you talk to republican senators they say the issue is not taxes, it's if you give the president more revenue he'll spend it on more government programs. >> senator harry reid should have made sure the senate passed a budget sometime in the last three years and it would be reconciled with the house and you would have a framework, a budget resolution. the fact we're down to the 59th minute of the 11th-hour and a couple elected officials and unelected staffs behind closed doors doing a back room deal is an outrage. >> in the final moments, a key development is that vice president joe biden has been in delaware for the weekend. he came back a few hours ago and is huddled behind closed doors, two phone calls with mitch mcconnell. a year and a half ago, it looked like all hope was lost and vice president with his long time in the senate many years was able to reach out to mitch mcconnell and they pulled a deal together in the final hours. >> the 59th minute of the 11th hour. ed henry, thank you very much. >>> goi
be a massive hit on the pentagon budget and what that means for our national defense. big deal. >> absolutely. thanks. joining us for a closer look at the fiscal cliff negotiations, ron johnson, a member of the appropriations and budget committees in the senate. thank you for taking a break from a busy time to visit with us. >> thank you. >> i want to get a response from the comments to the president. he said that g.o.p. can't take yes for an answer. is there an offer that would have been acceptable to the house or the senate g.o.p.? >> not that i am aware. people throw the numbers around, like there is a deal, $1 revenue for $3 spending cuts, i have never seen those deals. senator harry reid should have made sure the senate passed a budget, sometime in the past 3 years and that would be reconciled with the house and you would have a framework, you know, a budget resolution that the committee -- the appropriations committee, the house ways & means committee, senate finance committee, they would have the instructions to work on the difficult problems npublic. have a public debate. we are down
. that became more and more until the publication of "the pentagon papers." that was a gradual growth come a difference, between the media the new york times" and the administration, and that continues until the state. there is an oscillation between the administration and "the times" depending on the administration. that difference opened up cordially there, and it continued to. the skepticism to the vietnam war, and watergate, which is mostly "washington post" storage, increased trade gradually we have what we have today, an adversarial right fox, adversarial left, msnbc, and cnn, which is trying to be "the new york times," when nobody wants to see a non- adversarial. "the times" is a two-section newspaper, a term that "the times" does not like any more. the editor -- when you use in it, they get a little bit squeamish. some of you i should probably it, one of my sources -- took a great deal of reading the, and interviews. "the times" is generous in giving me access, letting the interview them. mostly, i got this through approaching them and asking them, and one led to the other. approa
.s. ambassador and three other americans were killed. our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence is joining us now with the findings. >> this new report spreads the blame for that attack. blaming intel, state, even the pentagon to some degree, saying there was no plan in place to rescue americans there. a new senate report says the state department should have shut down the benghazi mission before the attack that killed four americans. it chastised officials for relying on local militia to guard the front gate. >> the terrorists essentially walked into the compound, virtually unimpeded. >> senators say the state department missed plenty of red flags. a rocket propelled glen nate hit the red cross in may. a bomb exploded in june. another rpg hit the british ambassador's convoy, prompting the uk to close its mission. senators questioned how much more the state department needed to see before officials realized they didn't have enough security. >> we've got to close this facility because we can't protect american personnel in benghazi. >> reporter: the report also condemned communication failures. li
cuts kicking in. especially for defense. right now, the pentagon's looking at something in the neighborhood of a $55 billion cut in 2013, about 10% of its programs, and specifically, the "wall street journal," among others, reporting that the pentagon is making contingency plans to notify 800,000 civilian employees about possible furloughs. so this is front and center right now. and among those also sounding the alarm, senator lindsey graham after getting a call from defense secretary leon panetta over the weekend. >> last night at 7:30 during dinner, he said, lindsey, i'm told there's not going to be anything in this deal to avoid sequestration going into effect. >> there you have it in a nutshell. again, number one, we are getting hopefully a little more optimistic about either a short-term patchwork deal, setting the table for something bigger after the first of the year. but again, we've been talking primarily just on the tax side of the equation, the issue for the pentagon, the defense industry, and frankly, a whole lot of civilian employees, what about the sequeste
, but remember, the funding at the pentagon, without the wars, has doubled in the last ten years and it's a, you know, over 600 billion right now. so, 50 billion out of 600 billion, that's not even 10%. so, i really think we have is to keep perspective. these cuts aren't permanent, we can adjust them after the first of the year, i think we can make adjustments after the first of the year if we don't get a deal, still hopeful we get a deal if we don't, all of us know we can make adjustments. >> senator, thank you vet. i appreciate it. still hopeful, what senator mccaskill just said, martin, i can tell you, as i said, many of the colleagues coming out of the meeting, wrapped up right in there did not have that same assessment, see what happens, back to you. >> dana bash, thank you very much. >>> let's turn now to maine senator olympia snowe. she says it is time to talk about spending cuts and not limit the talk to just the tax hike question. senator snowe joins us now. let me start by asking, are you in favor, senator, of raising tax rates on anyone making more than $250,000 a year or are you more
for the pentagon. they didn't and that is why we are where we are. now, the scaled back deal is what you are saying the mini deal is what vice president biden is still trying to convince some skeptical liberal democrats in the senate to sign on to? >> absolutely right. they believed in president obama out on the campaign trail saying let's make these people of upper income above $250,000 pay more taxes. they were not happy with the negotiation because the republicans obviously don't want to raise taxes on anybody but if they are going to give the president who won reelection more revenue as part of a balance deal, if you will, they were willing to go up to $450,000 and so the vice president is eceptionly say -- essentially saying to liberal democrats who want to raise taxes on more people this is a good deal and keeps us from going off the fiscal cliff. you need to get onboard with this and h help me pass this across the finish line. there may be a little bit of stroking of some democratic egos in the caucus meeting to try to get this done. >> mike emanuel, thank you. as we look live at the ohio cl
from the white house on this. here is former pentagon adviser michael rubin. >> thanks for having me, michelle. >> what should the white house do in response to this? >> ultimately, what with will have to be inspected and considered is the whole nature of the reset policy. if we trace the beginnings of this crisis back it actually started with the white house reaching out to vladimir putin to russia in supporting russia's accession to the world trade organization. the amendment which had govern the a lot of u.s.-russian/soviet relations going back to the 1970s had to be replaced. it was replaced in congress by the act which set russia's worst human viets violators there should be consequences when it comes to getting visas. vladimir mute indecided to lash out to the united states by pointing a figurative rifle at the head of russia's orphans. >> we improve russia's trade relation with us, officially and then he gets upset because buried within there is a little clause that says, as you point out, the worst human rights violators should have trouble getting into the united states. how
game is down right nasty. >>> tributes from the pentagon, white house, and gulf war buddies after the passing of stormin general norman schwarzkopf. and teachers learning how to shoot in case a gunman walks into their classroom. the man offering lessons were free. "starting point" begins right now. friday, december 28th. and our starting point, the pace in's economy and your take home pay on the chopping block. four days remain before the u.s. goes over the edge. that means tax hikes and spending cuts that could trigger another recession. congressional leaders will meet today at 3:00 p.m. eastern time. the full house not even expected to return to work until sunday. here is the guest list for today's showdown. the president, vice president biden, senate majority leader harry reid and house minority leader nancy pelosi on the democratic side. house speaker john boehner, mitch mcconnell representing the republicans. brianna keilar live from washington. what do we expect to happen today? any new offers from the president or house speaker? >> we don't know. right now, all eyes on the
to libya were killed. the report also finds fault with the pentagon and the white house. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge live with that from washington. is this report different from the one that the state department investigation group put out, catherine? >> reporter: it is, jon. thank you and good morning. this congressional investigation also faults the pentagon for having no effective evacuation plan and faults the white house including president obama for his inconsistent statements about whether benghazi was a terrorist attack given the intelligence suggested within hours that an al-qaida affiliate was involved on september 11th. it sites mr. obama a's interview with 60 minutes on september 12th as evidence of inconsistent statements. he states it's too early to know exactly how this came about, what group was involved. obviously it was an attack on americans and we will be working with the libyan government to make sure we bring these folks to justice one way or the other. the president said in an interview over the weekend that there were quote, huge problems and
the impact on the military overall will be, quote, very serious. >> the pentagon and the departments are already in financial trouble, because there has already been a $480 billion cut that is being applied right now as we speak. to take another cut on top of that is devastating. >> reporter: it's not just the military itself that will take a hit, also the defense industry, defense contractors, private companies that do work for the pentagon. one democratic congressman in northern virginia whose district maybe hit the hardest by all of this says it could mean layoffs. >> the large defense contractors will probably be okay, they have significant cash reserves, most of them. the smaller contractors would have trouble getting their lines of credit extended, trouble keeping their employees, if they can't be assured of continued employment. >> reporter: congressman moran says if we go over the cliff, which he thinks we will, then the impact and severity of the automatic defense spending cuts depend how long they are in place into the new year before congress finally fixes this fiscal clif
. the report also faults the pentagon and the white house. it criticizes the obama administration for being inconsistent in explanations regarding what led to the attack, initially blame ago video, not terrorism. >>> san diego police officer is seriously injured when a suspected drunk driver slams right into his cop car. police say the suspect was speeding when he ran a red light, t boning the cruiser. took 45 minutes for crews to pry the officer out of his car. he is expected to be okay. the suspect was not seriously hurt, but he was arrested on suspicion of drunk driving. >>> kanye west kind of letting the cat out of the bag a little. listen. >> make some noise. >> juliet: i have no idea what he said. >> clayton: i don't either. >> juliet: then there was static. but apparently he said that his girlfriend, kim kardashian, is pregnantgo. he made the big announcement during a concert in atlantic city last night. sources say she had no idea he was going to spill the beans! oops, i hope the family knows. up 'til now, the family had denied pregnancy rumors. so congratulations to them. and we're
automatic, across-the-board spending cuts to the pentagon and domestic spending. we are getting your take on that this morning with our coverage on a "washington journal." here is what the majority leader harry reid had to say earlier this morning before the vote. >> working through the night and throughout the day, we have reached a deal with senator mcconnell to avert tax increases on middle class americans. i have said all along to our most important priority is to protect middle-class families. this legislation does that. middle-class families will wake up to date to the assurance that their taxes will not go up -- today to the assurance that the taxes will not go up $2,200 each. they will have the certainty to pay for groceries and car payments on next year. legislation protects 2 million americans lost their jobs during the great recession, losing their unemployment insurance. i'm disappointed that we were not able to make a grand bargain as we have for so long, but we tried. host: here is the headline in "the washington times." -- late into new year's eve, the criticism from the le
who are very upset with the cuts that would hit the pentagon. it may be difficult to rally republican votes of the cannot turn off the sequester. on the democratic side, the estate tax could be a problem. the republicans are insistent that the estate tax stay at current levels, which is exempting the state of $55 million at a relatively late 35% above that level. many democrats would like to see -- in january it is expected to come -- taxes are expected to go up dramatically. as small as $1 million would be taxed. most democrats want to see something in the metal. they are adamant that we cannot exempt states as large as $5 million. that could be another sticking point. >> do we expect anything going on today? if not, what is the earliest of the senators will come back in for session tomorrow? caller: i think the senate is due back in at 1:00. the house is due at 6:30. the house is the big question mark here. it is very difficult to imagine what could pass the house. as for today, that is an excellent question. the senate is not in here the house is not an. my understanding as we are
that preparation before running into the pentagon and he has done a is he person job. very tough job. even he said that we face some dire devastating times ahead if sequestration goes ahead. chuck hagel seems to think that we can cut, quote, more the bloat out of the pentagon. there probably is some over there. but you need to understand the system right, given of the republican opposition i don't know that the president gets a lot of credit for bipartisanship. more likely the cuts that they agree on. lt. colonel bob maginnis thanks so much we appreciate it. >> thanks, dave. >> small businesses set to take big hits in 2013. that could take an effect on your wallet. we'll explain next. my pet chicken just saved my life. how this hero bird came to the rescue of an entire family. and that's not even the coolest part of this story. i'm sticking around. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve
as part of this, but we do have to have cuts. the pentagon's got to be part of that, and health care, this is where it's tough for the democrats. health care has to be part of this. that's not medicare benefit cuts. there's a lot of things we can do to deal with the high cost of health care in this country that goes up two or three times the rate of inflation, so having prescription drug price negotiations, that would save $160 billion, moving away from fee for service to more of a performance based system, things that we can make progress on that allow the american people to have access to health care but have it be affordable and sustainable but that's tough. >> all of the low hanging fruit is gone. if it were easy to do congress would have done it by now. >> that's right. >> so -- go ahead. >> it's true. the things that lay ahead that are really a challenge, largely is health care because that cost in the whole economy not just medicare is going up faster than we can afford. that's really the bottom line so how do we reform our health care system and bring the cost in line so it's
the experience to manage an organization like the pentagon. margaret thatcher leaving the hospital. she was admitted last week for an operation to remove a bladder growth. >> gregg: senate majority leader harry reid saying he is not overly optimistic that a deal will be reached to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. even if they get something passed here there are other challenges that our economy will face. global powers like china and europe and japan are having major problems of their own. that could affect the way they do business with us. joining us is to talk about, ed, good to see you. biggest problem some of these governments to stimulate their economies, die let's just print a bunch of money. that has catastrophic events with them and even with the united states that may tried traded with them. >> that seems to be just to print money. that is not how it works. when somebody prints money, it's devalues their currency which makes anything they want to export or anything that they are importing more expensive. that is why your food is more expensive because we imported a lot of that
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